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Photo, Journal and Letter detailing the fate of Captain Harrison Forsythe
Photo, Journal and Letter detailing the fate of Captain Harrison Forsythe

Photo of Harrison Forsythe (upper left)

 

Letter to Elizabeth Forsythe (lower left)

Only surviving relative to Captain Harrison Forsythe.

Sent by Robert Fraser, the Chairman of the Royal Geographic Society upon the discovery of the remains of Captain Forsythe. It reads:

27 Oct  1912

My dear Miss Forsythe,

It is my unfortunate duty to inform you that proof positive has at last been found regarding the outcome of your brave father’s ultimate expedition to locate the city of Zed deep in the Amazon, so many years ago.

We here at the RGS are greatly saddened by this news. Your father was a great explorer and brave man. I am proud to have known him and called him a fellow.

Under separate carriage we are sending the unfortunate remains identified as your father, Harrison Forsythe. If you feel a Christian burial is not possible or is somehow inappropriate, we would be willing to take custody of said remains and with your permission, put them on display in the Map Room as a memorial to Captain Forsythe and others like him, lost whilst bringing light to the dark places of the world.

Yours sincerely

RA Fraser

 

The Journal of Captain Harrison Forsythe (upper right)

The final entry in his journal consists of a drawing of his campsite and the following text:

"...hope to get through this region in a few days, and are camped near the river for a couple of days. We go on with six animals—three saddle mules, two cargo mules and a madrinha, a leading animal which keeps the others together. Moore is well and fit though he suffers from the insects. I myself am bitten or stung by ticks, mosquitos and these piums, as they call the tiny ones, all over my body. Percy I am anxious about. He still has one leg in a bandage, but won't go back.

I calculate to contact Indians in about a week or ten days, when we should reach the waterfall which marks the pass to the city.

We have no fear of any failure."

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